Ember Octane: Components

This post is the second in a series on building an Ember application HTML-first. In this series, we're going to build the EmberConf schedule application from the ground up. Let's GoComponents ← This postPulling Out DataAirtable TimeCleaning Things UpAdding More PagesPolishing: Server-Side Rendering, Prerendering and Code SplittingHere's what we built in…

Ember Octane: Let's Go

Last week, in my Virtual EmberConf keynote, I told the story about how I got started as a programmer. To make a long story short, I took a job as a web designer for a large non-profit. I had picked up a little bit of HTML and CSS through Microsoft…

"We're the Together Framework"

I remember the first time I saw Melanie Sumner describe Ember as "the together framework". It was 2019, and I was sitting in the audience of the Amsterdam Ember meetup for the premiere of Ember: The Documentary. The lights had dimmed, the room quieted down, but my nervous energy refused…

Together: The Merb Story

I'll never forget the day that I became a member of the Rails core team. For all of 2008 (and the better part of 2007), I was working on a competitor to Ruby on Rails called Merb. I loved Merb, and was excited to share it with anyone who'd listen,…

#EmberJS2019 More Accessible Than Ever

It's that time of year again: time to think about what the next year of Ember should hold. Personally, I feel really great about the community's effort around the Octane edition. What's great about Octane, and any future edition we do, is that it's a focus on polishing and documenting…

Fun with PowerShell: Installation

In my post on exploring PowerShell, I jumped right in to exploring PowerShell. If you're on Windows, you already have PowerShell, and you can follow along. If you're on OSX, the easiest way to install PowerShell is $ brew cask install powershell $ pwsh There are more details at Installing PowerShell Core…

#Rust2018 - Exploring New Contribution and Feedback Models

Since I'm coming pretty late to the #Rust2018 party, most of the things I wanted to say have already been said! Ashley's kick-off post was kind of a meta-#Rust2018 for me, calling for us to experiment with new ways to get community feedback in Rust. I personally really enjoyed…